Little Eyes Are Watching: Why my Choices Matter

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I’m finding myself more and more irritated with sitcoms and commercials these days. So many of them portray dads as bumbling fools who can’t be trusted to take care of their kids or share in the housework. And even if they’re respected in the workplace, at home they’re childish and selfish and their wives chastise them in front of the kids on a regular basis. I don’t know which causes me to get more upset: the way men are portrayed or how women react to the men.

Betsy Corning has heard George Barna speak many times and according to research done by the Barna Group, most kids have developed their worldview by age thirteen. A worldview is the lens through which we see life. It affects how we view the world, culture, family, church, God. My seven-year-old will have a well-developed worldview in less than six years! Realizing this has made me think more deeply about some things.

 Not only will my kids have developed their worldview about the world, culture, etc., but they will also have a worldview about the home and how it functions. So, what do they see in our home? How will my actions and my husband’s actions influence them? How do Jason and I treat each other? Do we show each other love and affection? Do we display core truths of the Bible? Do I honor Jason? Even in the little things, do I act in such a way that shows our kids that I love and respect Daddy?

 Overall, the answer is yes. But recently, I’ve done a few things that, in retrospect, are not a positive influence for my kids. Yes, they’re small and might seem insignificant, but those are the things kids pick up on! A couple weeks ago, Jason took the kids to school because I was sick. I let our three-year-old, Hunter, take his stuffed fox in the car on the way to school. He leaves it in the car and then it’s there when I pick him up after preschool. As Jason was getting the kids ready to go he told Hunter to leave his fox at home. I corrected Jason in front of the kids and told him that I let Hunter take his fox in the car. There have been a few other instances like this. Like I said, they’re not big deals, but I’m correcting Jason in front of the kids. I felt convicted about it so I apologized to him.

 As I’ve been pondering how my actions with Jason influence my kids, I’ve also become aware that not only are my actions with him significant, but my actions by what I choose to let our kids be exposed to are significant.

 I’m a Food Network and Cooking Channel junkie. I don’t like to cook, but I like watching others cook. So while the shows I have on aren’t an issue, the commercials can be. The kids will see commercials where wives and kids are rolling their eyes at Dad because he tried to fix the leaky faucet but made a mess or he forgot to pick up someone from soccer practice.

 Even these commercials, as short as they are, can be a negative influence as my kids are developing their worldview about family life. Granted, the kids are usually playing with toys or watching a video on our iPad so they’re not focused on the commercial. But it’s still there in the background.

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 I need to show my kids that I’m for Jason. That’s something Betsy focused on the last couple weeks at our Entrusted Bible Study. (If you haven’t gone through the study, find one or start one – you won’t regret it!) I need to let Jason provide, protect, and lead our family. I want to be like the Proverbs 31 woman – doing him good and not evil all the days of my life. Why? Well, first, the Bible commands it. Second, it strengthens our marriage. And third, it shows our kids what marriage should look like. It will help them develop a healthy and biblical worldview about family and home.

As with everything in my life, I will mess up. But even in those times I’m not the best wife I should be, when I apologize to Jason in front of the kids, that too will be a positive example of how the family should act and will help our kids develop a biblical worldview.

Posted on December 4, 2018 and filed under Building Your Family.